Dementia Mythbusters – The Facts About Dementia

Written by Active Minds on Friday the 14th of April 2017.

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With an estimated 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK information and resources relating to dementia have never been more available. However, with the volumes of information out there, it can often be hard to identify the facts from the fiction.

We’ve compiled a list of common misunderstandings about dementia, so you can gain a better understanding of the disease, for you or your loved one:

Myth

Only elderly people get dementia.

Fact

Whilst dementia is a more common diagnosis in the elderly, people can in fact be diagnosed with the disease in their 50s, 40s and even their 30s. This type of dementia is categorised as Young Onset Alzheimer’s.

Myth

Dementia and memory loss are a natural part of old age.

Fact

Memory loss is a common symptom of aging, there is a stark difference between the occasional memory blank and dementia. With dementia, one of the first signs of the disease is memory loss, but there are other symptoms involved. And conversely, whilst memory loss is a sign of dementia, if a person suffers from forgetfulness, that does not necessarily mean that they have dementia. Further investigation would need to take place.

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Myth

Cooking with aluminium pans and drinking out of aluminium cans can cause Alzheimer’s.

Fact

During the 1960s and 1970s, there was a concern that increased use of aluminium in products such as pots, drink cans and antiperspirant, was one of the leading causes of Alzheimer’s. However, further studies have failed to find any links and experts today believe that every day uses of aluminium are not cause for concern.

Myth

There is a cure for dementia.

Fact

Sadly, there are currently no known cures for stopping the disease, though research into a successful treatment is extensive and constant. There are, however, there are a number of treatments  that may help slow down the progression of the disease for a time.